#BeGlobalReady

Great new initiative coming from the US Department of Education, #BeGlobalReady for more information click here.

On the occasion of the 18th International Education Week, the International and Foreign Language Education (IFLE) Office of the U.S. Department of Education is pleased to share with you a new series of images and messages to encourage U.S. students, teachers, and citizens to “be global ready”. We hope these images and messages will help spread the word about the value of international and foreign language education for all!

The series of images is available to use in your organizations, schools, classrooms, and communities. The images are available for free download at:https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ope/iegps/globalready.html 

We also encourage you to share your own stories on social media using #BeGlobalReady.

Happy International Education Week!

#BeGlobalReady

#BeGlobalReady

Medicine, Science, and Technology in the Study of Asian Pasts and Presents

AAS Dissertation Workshop

Medicine, Science, and Technology in the Study of Asian Pasts and Presents
March 19-22, 2018
Washington, D.C.

Interests in the interdisciplinary studies of science, technology, and medicine have expanded in the last twenty years, raising new questions in response to contemporary developments. Some studies have looked at ways in which foreign technology was adopted and adapted in Asia. Others have looked at how technical, scientific, mathematical, botanical, and medical knowledge from Asia has traveled across the globe. Some have traced the impact of Asian foods, traditional medicines, indigenous plant and animal species on global trade. Others have problematized interpretations of meta-categories like science, nature, health, and development. This workshop invites applications from PhD candidates working on the history, politics, ethics, and sociology of medicine, science, and technology. It will provide a venue for the interdisciplinary and comparative examination of these relationships, both today and historically.

The workshop will be limited to 12 students, ideally from a broad array of disciplines and working on a wide variety of materials and in various regions of Asia. It also will include a small multidisciplinary and multi-area faculty with similar interests.

The workshop is scheduled for the days immediately preceding the 2018 AAS annual conference in Washington, D.C. It will begin with dinner on the evening of Monday, March 19, continue for the next two and one-half days of intense discussion, and close with lunch on Thursday, March 22.

The AAS will be able to provide limited financial support for participants including three night’s accommodations, meals, and partial “need-based” travel funds. Students are encouraged to approach their home institutions for additional support. It is hoped that participants also will attend the AAS annual conference immediately following the workshop.

Applicants need not have advanced to candidacy but must have at least drafted a dissertation research proposal. Applications are also welcome from doctoral students in the early phases of writing their dissertations. Applicants do not have to be current AAS members to apply for the workshop, but if selected, must join or renew their membership to participate. Applications consist of two items only:

1) a current Curriculum Vitae, and
2) the dissertation proposal, or if the research and writing is well under way, a statement of the specific issues being addressed, the intellectual approach, and the materials being studied. Neither the proposal nor statement should exceed 10 double-spaced pages in length using standard-sized fonts. Application materials should be sent as email attachments to Michael Paschal ( mpaschal@asian-studies.org) no later than January 8, 2018. Please include “Dissertation Workshop Application” in the email subject box.

Workshop participants will be selected on the basis of the submitted projects, the potential for useful exchanges among them, and a concern to include a wide range of disciplinary perspectives, intellectual traditions, and regions of Asia. Applicants will be informed whether or not they have been selected for the workshop later in January.

For further information about the workshop, or eligibility, please contact Michael Paschalmpaschal@asian-studies.org, or Justin McDaniel jmcdan@sas.upenn.edu. Faculty having related research interests who would be interested in serving as mentors for the workshop also should contact the organizers for details. Modest supplemental funding will be available to mentors to help offset related costs.

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 Yseali Professional Fellows Program

Call for Applications

 (SPRING 2018)

Deadline: November 17, 2017 

The American Council of Young Political Leaders (ACYPL) and the U.S Department of State, in cooperation with The United States - Indonesia Society (USINDO) are pleased to announce the application process and deadlines for the Spring 2018 Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative (YSEALI) Professional Fellows Program. The YSEALI is the US government's signature program to strengthen leadership development as well as networking in Southeast Asia, particularly between young leaders from United States and Southeast Asia.

The YSEALI PFP Spring 2018 will be held from April 21 - June 2, 2018. This year will focus on the theme of governance and society. It is open to young political and policy leaders from Indonesia, Brunei, Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam. The YSEALI PFP includes a week of political and policy discussions in Washington, DC; a month-long individual fellowship in an American office; and participation in a three-day global Professional Fellows Congress in Washington, DC. This exchange of ideas and knowledge will serve as a foundation on which to establish sustainable two-way partnerships between the young political and policy professionals from these Southeast Asian countries and their American counterparts, with the goal of strengthening good governance, enhancing economic empowerment, and increasing civic engagement. With the invaluable experience gained from this fellowship, the young leaders from Southeast Asia may identify their generation's greatest challenges in the region and develop ideas in tackling them. 

Eligibility Requirements:

  • Must be a citizen of Indonesia, Brunei, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, or Vietnam and have a professional background and project related to the legislative process and governance

  • Between the ages of 25-35

  • Fluent in oral and written English
  • Provide a comprehensive, well-conceived written framework for a project to benefit civil society or governance in your home country
  • Self-directed and able to work effectively in cross-cultural settings
  • Demonstrated commitment to public service
  • Leadership potential in the government, private sector, or civil society
  • Committed to organizing an 7-10 day program in their country for an American mentor
  • Committed to become an active member in the YSEALI community
  • Cannot hold a dual-US citizenship or have traveled on a J-1 VISA for a Department of State sponsored program in the past two years.

International Fellows Overview

The international fellows from each country will travel to Washington, DC for a 5-day program orientation and federal government overview as well as cultural outings.

Each fellow will participate in a 4-week intensive fellowship in a separate political, policy, or civil society office with day-to-day mentoring and guidance from a single point of contact, their fellowship host. The fellows will meet their American mentor, an ACYPL alumni, to attend meetings pertaining to current events in the area, and together will develop action plans for a series of follow-on activities to be conducted in the fellows' home country. 

At the conclusion of the program, all international fellows will return to Washington, DC for a 3-day Professional Fellows Congress where they will interact and share their experiences with other international fellows from different programs.

Upon returning to their home countries, select international fellows will work with their American mentors to create an 7-10 day program in which the American mentor will visit each of fellows' places of employment to learn more about what they do, assist in the continuing implementation of their project, meet with local leaders, as well as enjoy cultural outings.

Application Instructions and Deadline:

The application is accessible through here or if you would like to see the program at-a-glance you can access this link first. Kindly note, we do not accept direct or hard copy submission.

Eligible candidates are required to submit the complete application form byNovember 17, 2017 the latest. An incomplete or late submission will not be considered. If you were recommended or learned about this program from USINDO (ACYPL's in-country program partner), please indicate it in the application form. 

Only shortlisted candidates will be interviewed by the panel consisting of representatives from ACYPL, U.S. Embassy, and USINDO.

Should you have any further inquiries and questions, please contact Mr. Elliot Bell-Krasnerat at Ebkrasner@acypl.org or Ms. Kaylee Boalt at kboalt@acypl.orgor by phone at +(1) 202-857-0999.

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Responsive Preservation Initiative for Cultural Heritage Resources

Responsive Preservation Initiative for Cultural Heritage Resources

Supported by the J.M. Kaplan Fund, CAORC is pleased to announce the new Responsive Preservation Initiative (RPI) for Cultural Heritage Resources. The RPI program is designed to fund projects for urgent, emergent, or priority issues that need to be addressed quickly. Small grants are available for rapid emergency projects in Algeria, Cyprus, Egypt, Greece, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Libya, Morocco, The Palestinian Territories, Tunisia, Turkey, and Yemen.

Eligibility

  • Professionals working to preserve archaeological sites and related CHRs in countries where permanent American overseas research centers' networks exits are encouraged to apply. Individuals or teams may apply for funding. Biographies for all team members must be included in the proposal.
  • Proposed projects should address urgent, emergent, or priority issues that need to be addressed quickly.
  • Projects must propose a time-bound intervention in one of the following countries: Algeria, Cyprus, Egypt, Greece, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Libya, Morocco, The Palestinian Territories, Tunisia, Turkey, and Yemen.

Applications

Applications will be considered on a rolling basis. Apply now by clicking here

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Multi-Country Research Fellowship Program

Multi-Country Research Fellowship Program

The CAORC Multi-Country Research Fellowship Program supports advanced regional or transregional research in the humanities, social sciences, or allied natural sciences for US doctoral candidates and scholars who have already earned their PhD. Preference will be given to candidates examining comparative and/or cross-regional research. Scholars must carry out research in two or more countries outside the US, at least one of which hosts a participating American overseas research center. Approximately eight awards of up to $10,500 each will be given each year.

Eligibility

Applicants must:

  • be a US citizen. Proof of citizenship (photocopy of passport) must be shown upon award notification;
  • have a PhD or be a doctoral candidate who has completed all PhD requirements with the exception of the dissertation;
  • be engaged in the study of and research in the humanities, social sciences, and allied natural sciences;
  • seek to conduct research of regional or trans-regional significance in two or more countries outside the US, one of which must host a participating American overseas research center (AORC). Please note travel is currently restricted by the U.S. Department of State to the following AORC countries: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Iraq, Pakistan (senior scholars may be permitted to travel to Lahore and Islamabad subject to approval), and Yemen.

Applications

Applications for the Multi-Country Research Fellowship Program are now available atorcfellowships.fluidreview.com.

The deadline for submissions is January 31, 2018 and announcements are expected to be made by the end of April 2018. More information can be found here

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NEH Senior Research Fellowship Program

NEH Senior Research Fellowship Program

The CAORC National Endowment for the Humanities Senior Research Fellowship Program supports advanced research in the humanities for US postdoctoral scholars, and foreign national postdoctoral scholars who have been residents in the US for three or more years. Fellowship stipends are $4,200 per month for a total of four months.

Eligibility

Applicants must:

  • carry out research in a country which hosts a participating American overseas research center. Eligible countries for 2018 are: Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Cambodia, Cyprus, Georgia, Indonesia, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Senegal, Sri Lanka or Tunisia;
  • be postdoctoral scholars;
  • be US citizens or foreign nationals who have been residents in the US for three years prior to the application deadline.

Applications

Applications for the NEH Senior Research Fellowship Program are now available atorcfellowships.fluidreview.com.

The deadline for submissions is January 31, 2018 and announcements are expected to be made by the end of April 2018. More information can be found here

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Genocide and Justice

Genocide and Justice:  The Ongoing Search for Truth and Accountability for the 1965-1966 Indonesian Mass Killings

Coming up in New York City, a lecture on the 1965 atrocities in Indonesia.  For more information, click here.

Fifty-two years ago, in the wake of an alleged coup attempt known as the September 30th Movement, the Indonesian Army launched a campaign of mass murder against supporters of the Indonesian Communist Party and its affiliated organizations, killing an estimated 500,000 unarmed civilians, imprisoning hundreds of thousands more, and bringing to power General Suharto, who ruled Indonesia for 32 years before his ouster in 1998.

This talk will explore recent efforts to research the mass killings in Indonesia as well as ongoing campaigns for truth and accountability, nearly twenty years after Suharto’s ouster. It will argue that, amidst a resurgence of “anti-communist” campaigns and repression, the success of both is crucial for the stability of Indonesia’s fragile democracy.

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Solo, Solitude Screening with Filmmakers at Cornell

Date/Time: October 16, 2017 - 7:00pm
Location: Willard Straight Theatre, Cornell University 

Riots break out in Indonesia in July 1996, and Wiji is suspected of dissident activities. He flees Solo for Borneo, thousands of miles away, and has to decide between the fear of detection and the desire to return home to his wife and children. A sensitive portrait of living with dignity under tyranny, where the mundane poetry of everyday life coexists with the pain of emotional exile. Based on the life of major Indonesian dissident-poet Wiji Thukul. Nominated for the Golden Leopard at the Locarno International Film Festival.

For more information, click here

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Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi Speaking in NYC

Date/Time: September 25 2017 - 4:15pm
Location: Asia Society, 725 Park Ave. New York, NY 10021

The Asia Society will host Her Excellency Retno Marsudi, the Foreign Minister of the Republic of Indonesia, for an address on "a Global Ecosystem of Peace and Stability," followed by a moderated discussion with Daniel Russel of the Asia Society Policy Institute. Minister Marsudi will provide insight into Indonesia's vision towards regional peace and stability in the face of current challenges.

The Asia Society has generously offered a number of complimentary tickets to NYSEAN members.  To reserve your ticket, please contact Mr. Sanjeev Sherchan at SSherchan@AsiaSociety.org

For more information, click here.

 

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Sumarsam Honored by Indonesian Ministry of Culture and Education

Wesleyan Professor, author, and gamelan master, Sumarsam, is being offered an award by the Indonesian Ministry of Culture and Education for his achievements in developing gamelan and sharing Indonesian culture.  For more information, click here.

Sumarsam, who is celebrating his 45th year at Wesleyan, teaches conference participants about gamelan. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Sumarsam, who is celebrating his 45th year at Wesleyan, teaches conference participants about gamelan. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

Call for Papers: Asia and the Anthropocene

Call for Papers

“Asia and the Anthropocene” 

The AAS is pleased to invite applications to participate in the second of three workshops in its series “Emerging Fields in the Study of Asia” supported by the Luce Foundation. The second workshop, “Asia and the Anthropocene,” will take place August 23-27, 2018 at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

The purpose of this gathering is to explore the emerging concept of the Anthropocene through shared readings and collective conversations about how scholars of Asia might best respond to the scientific proposal of a new geological epoch. The selection committee seeks bold ideas and broadly framed research papers that grapple with the challenges posed by this new understanding of planetary conditions. Participants will present short papers (20-30 pages, double spaced, including notes) designed to further this new field of study, leaving ample time for discussion. We will also read and discuss certain key texts that are relevant to this emerging field. The workshop will include a field trip to a location to be determined.

The goal of this workshop is to explore a range of ways in which scholars in non-science fields might draw on their regional expertise to engage with the dramatic paradigm shift that sees human beings as a planet-changing species. We welcome a broad range of participants to this workshop but are especially interested in scholars early in their careers (including doctoral students) and scholars based in Asia. Participation will be limited to a maximum of 12 people plus members of the planning committee. While AAS membership is not required for application, if accepted to the workshop participants must become members of the Association for Asian Studies. Papers presented at the workshop may be selected for presentation at a panel at the annual meeting of the AAS and/or for publication (subject to peer review) in a leading journal in the field of Asian Studies.


Definition of the Anthropocene

The concept of the Anthropocene arose among Earth System scientists, explicitly as a geological term, to describe the unprecedented anthropogenic transformation of the Earth System. It can be measured in three complementary ways—through the “planetary boundaries” concept proposed by Johan Rockström and colleagues, the “great acceleration” proposed by Will Steffen and colleagues, and, most explicitly, through the planetary stratum (GSSP) marking the shift from the Holocene Epoch, which is now under consideration by the Anthropocene Working Group. While human beings have always been biological and ecological agents transforming our environment, for the first time ever our species has become a geological force irreversibly altering the Earth System and thus changing the conditions for all living organisms. The date proposed by the scientific community for this rupture is the mid-twentieth century. The challenge for Asianists in non-science disciplines is threefold: to understand this science, to grapple with what the Anthropocene means for Asia, and to explore what it means for our various disciplines.


Issues of the Anthropocene for Scholars of Asia

This proposed new geological epoch has many ramifications for the study of Asia and there is, so far, little consensus about how humanists and social scientists in Asian studies should respond. But, undoubtedly, thinking about Asia is essential for thinking about the Anthropocene because of its sheer weight—in geographical size and population—in world affairs. This workshop seeks to refocus the exclusively Eurocentric lens through which the Anthropocene is often understood by non-scientists.

Among the topics of interest, although certainly not limited to these, are the following questions:

(1) How does understanding the Anthropocene as the result of collective human forces change the relationship between the sciences, on the one hand, and the humanities and social sciences on the other? Some have argued that since human and natural forces have merged, the natural sciences and human-centered studies should merge, while other scholars promote disciplinary pluralism.

(2) What political, social, and economic forces have led to the Anthropocene? Among the answers currently proposed are inequality, industrialization, developmentalism, capitalism, imperialism, globalization, and population growth.

(3) When did these forces emerge and/or become unstoppable? Some point to such things as the invention of fire, agriculture, or industrialization; still others emphasize contingent developments either in the distant past or more recently. Each framing creates a different understanding not only of the origins of the Anthropocene and Asia’s relation to it but also of our capacity to mitigate its effects.

(4) Which cultural, religious, and intellectual constructs have led to the overshoot of earth systems, and which might help us to meet the challenge of our changed conditions?

(5) Are there new forms of community, politics, and economic activity in Asia that might bring hope through adaptation and resilience?

Cost

The summer workshop is supported by a generous grant from the Luce Foundation. Expenses for travel, room, and board will be covered for all participants for the duration of the workshop.


How to Apply

Scholars wishing to participate in the 2018 summer workshop are asked to submit via email an abstract of no more than two pages (single-spaced, 12 point font), accompanied by a CV of no more than two pages to AAS Executive Director Michael Paschal at mpaschal@asian-studies.org. In addition to a short description of the specific issues to be addressed in the proposed paper, the abstract should explain how these issues speak to the larger question of Asia and the Anthropocene.

Applications will be reviewed by a panel of senior scholars who have agreed to act as mentors for the workshop. Questions about the application process or administrative matters should be directed to Michael Paschal at the address listed above. Questions about topic suitability or other substantive issues may be addressed to the organizer, Arjun Guneratne, at guneratne@macalester.edu.

The deadline for applications is October 2, 2017. Successful applicants will be notified by November 6.

CAORC Applications Now Open

CAORC is pleased to announce the 2017-2018 fellowship applications are now available online! Please find further details below. 

NEH Senior Research Fellowship Program

The CAORC National Endowment for the Humanities Senior Research Fellowship Program supports advanced research in the humanities for US postdoctoral scholars, and foreign national postdoctoral scholars who have been residents in the US for three or more years. Fellowship stipends are $4,200 per month for a total of four months.

Eligibility

Applicants must:
  • carry out research in a country which hosts a participating American overseas research center. Eligible countries for 2018 are: Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Cyprus, Georgia, Indonesia, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Senegal, Sri Lanka or Tunisia;
  • be postdoctoral scholars;
  • be US citizens or foreign nationals who have been residents in the US for three years prior to the application deadline.

Applications

Applications for the NEH Senior Research Fellowship Program are now available at orcfellowships.fluidreview.com

The deadline for submissions is January 31, 2018 and announcements are expected to be made by the end of April 2018. More information can be found here.  

Multi-Country Research Fellowship Program

The CAORC Multi-Country Research Fellowship Program supports advanced regional or transregional research in the humanities, social sciences, or allied natural sciences for US doctoral candidates and scholars who have already earned their PhD. Preference will be given to candidates examining comparative and/or cross-regional research. Scholars must carry out research in two or more countries outside the US, at least one of which hosts a participating American overseas research center. Approximately eight awards of up to $10,500 each will be given each year.

Eligibility

Applicants must:
  • be a US citizen. Proof of citizenship (photocopy of passport) must be shown upon award notification;
  • have a PhD or be a doctoral candidate who has completed all PhD requirements with the exception of the dissertation;
  • be engaged in the study of and research in the humanities, social sciences, and allied natural sciences;
  • seek to conduct research of regional or trans-regional significance in two or more countries outside the US, one of which must host a participating American overseas research center (AORC). Please note travel is currently restricted by the U.S. Department of State to the following AORC countries: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Iraq, Pakistan, and Yemen.

Applications

Applications for the Multi-Country Research Fellowship Program are now available at orcfellowships.fluidreview.com.

The deadline for submissions is January 31, 2018 and announcements are expected to be made by the end of April 2018. More information can be found here.  

CAORC Member Centers represent the following countries:

Afghanistan, Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Cyprus, Egypt, Georgia, Greece, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Jordan, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Pakistan, Palestine, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Tunisia, Turkey, and Yemen

CAORC’s Multi-Country Research Fellowship and NEH Senior Research Fellowship

CAORC’s Multi-Country Research Fellowship and NEH Senior Research Fellowship will be opening for applications this Friday, September 1 with a deadline of midnight on January 31, 2018.  For those interested, you can find out more information about the fellowship programs here: https://www.caorc.org/faq Applications will be available in Fluid Review:  https://orcfellowships.fluidreview.com/

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Open Forum

The Internationalization of Indonesian Arts & Gamelan in the U.S. and Other Countries

Location and information:

Open Forum on:  Thursday, September 7, 2017:09:30 - 11:30 am; (Registration starts at 9:00)

Venue:

Ruang Recital, Jakarta Institute of Arts (IKJ)
Gedung Musik Lt. 4, Fakultas Seni Pertunjukan
Kompleks Taman Ismail Marzuki No. 73
Jalan Cikini Raya, Menteng, Jakarta Pusat
(IKJ Campus and room entrance is located
on the narrow road left side of the XXI CinePlex TIM)

Abstract:

The Internationalization of Indonesian Arts & Gamelan in the U.S. and Other Countries

Globalization brought forth many opportunities for Indonesia, including the unanticipated prospect of cultural influence abroad through performance arts. The internationalization of Indonesian arts, either musical instruments, dance and visual arts, have been well-accepted by many countries including in the U.S.

For musical instruments, the gamelan specifically, there are close to two hundred sets of the instruments in the United States as of 2017, many of which maintain consistent performing groups. Furthermore, gamelan and its related arts now enjoy healthy affinity groups around the world, in places such Australia, the British Isles, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico, and New Zealand, to name a few. As gamelan has traveled to different parts of the world, it simultaneously carries with it parts of its cultural heritage from Indonesia and acquires new meaning overseas.

This forum explores some of the characteristics of the presence of gamelan in the United States, as well as the intersections of gamelan music and experimental composition. Using the case study of Gamelan Son of Lion, founded in 1976 and still active today, Mr. Jay M. Arms displays how they helped lead the way in developing a repertoire of American music for gamelan that draws on elements of Javanese and Balinese gamelan with American experimental music. Gamelan Son of Lion is among the oldest and longest running gamelan ensembles to champion new composition for gamelan in the United States.

Dr. Julianti Parani and Mr. Jay M. Arms will also cover central questions regarding the future of the Indonesian performance arts abroad: What are the forces shaping the future of Indonesian cultural presence in the international world? What kind of push and pull exists in creating gamelan and other Indonesian arts as global art forms? What kinds of artistic and cultural practices are shared across different communities in the U.S. and Indonesia? How will performance art serve and contribute towards the strengthening of Indonesia's bilateral relationship with the United States?

For those who are interested in academic journal writing, please join us for a short and collaborative workshop session subsequently (10:30 - 11:30) on Tips and Techniques for Academic Journal Writing.
To register, please kindly RSVP HERE: email to usindojkt@usindo.org, or contact +62 813 1129 8780 no later than September 4, 2017 at 5:00 PM to attend this Open Forum.   

Speakers' Bio:

Jay M. Arms is a Ph.D candidate in cultural musicology track and teaching assistant at University of California, Santa Cruz. In the past seven years, he has pursued research for his dissertation entitled "Gamelan as World Citizen: American Experimental Music and the Internationalization of Gamelan" (expected 2018). His expertise and interests include experimental music, gamelan, improvisation, music and politics, 20th century music, musical instruments and musical communities. He currently serves as the Associate Editor of Balungan: The Journal of the American Gamelan Institute (AGI), an annual peer-reviewed journal dedicated to gamelan and its related arts around the world. He's presented his research at the Society for American Music (SAM), the Society for Ethnomusicology (SEM), The Northern California Chapter of the American Musicological Society (NCCAMS), the International Society of Minimalist Music (MinSoc), and the International Society for Improvised Music (ISIM). 

Jay's publications as sole author has been published in The Open Space Magazine, Tempo, and The Bulletin for the Society for American Music. Jay has received multiple honors and awards, including Arts Divisions Dean's Award for best presentation in the 2017 US Santa Cruz Graduate Research Symposium. 

As a musician, Jay is an active performer of contemporary music for guitar, presenting new works by composers such as Jack Body, Cornelius Cardew, Nikita Koshkin, Nick Norton, and Martin Rokeach. As a gamelan performer, Jay has studied Sundanese gamelan with Undang Sumarna since 2014 and Central Javanese gamelan with Midiyanto S. Putro since 2017, performing with both groups regularly in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Dr. Julianti Parani, is a lecturer, cultural and historical researcher, dancer, and choreographer with more than four decades of experience. She teaches Cultural Studies in Jakarta Institute of the Arts (IKJ). She acquired her Southeast Asian Studies Doctorate from the National University of Singapore. Her dissertation, "National Culture and Ethnic Cultures: Government Policy and Performing Arts in 20th Century Indonesia," honed in on the relationship among Indonesian nationalism, identity, and the continuing cultural debate surrounding official cultural policy in Indonesia. She is currently a Board Member for ARTS FISSION, the longest incorporated contemporary dance company in Singapore. 

Since 1960, she has choreographed dances culturally influenced by Indonesian ethnic culture performed both domestically and internationally. Her passion to elevate Betawinese culture artistically, as well as through scholarship, led her to produce new dance works as well as a compendium of publications. She has published a book titled Bunga Rampai Seni Pertunjukan Kebetawian (Potpourri of Betawinese Performing Arts) and written articles in Wacana Seni Journal of Arts Discourse.

In 1992, she assisted in the creation of Indonesian Dance Festival (IDF) along with other notable figures, such as Farida Oetoyo, Sardono W Kusumo and Tom Ibnur. After deepening her study by working at the Republic of Indonesia National Archives for thirty years, she retired in 1995. She received an award from the local DKI Jakarta government as a dance practitioner for her cultural expertise and Satya Lencana award from the Indonesian Ministry of Education and Culture.

The United States-Indonesia Society's mission is strengthening mutual understanding between the United States and Indonesia, enhancing the bilateral relationship, and deepening the U.S.-Indonesia Strategic Partnership. We implement our mission through public discussions in each country and long-term bi-national programs in the education, legislative, and other sectors, including the US-Indonesia Joint Council on Higher Education Partnership and the newly-created Indonesia-U.S. Council on Religion and Pluralism.

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USINDO Summer Studies Program in Indonesia

 The United States – Indonesia Society (USINDO) is sharing information about the 2018 USINDO Summer Studies Program in Indonesia (May 24 - August 2, 2018), and no accepting applications from interested parties. 

As the most dynamic emerging economy in Southeast Asia, the largest Muslim-majority country, third largest democratic country and one of the most diverse countries in the world, Indonesia is an important country for the U.S and in Asia. The USINDO Summer Studies program aims to provide American students with the language ability, political awareness, culture sensitivity and understanding of this increasingly significant country. For the past 23 years, USINDO has hosted an intensive ten-week language and cultural immersion program, held in Yogyakarta for U.S. university students, currently enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate degree program, as well as recent graduates (within 6 months) of any accredited U.S. college or university.

During the Summer Studies Program, students will take classes in reading, writing, and speaking Indonesian language for 20 hours every week and experience living with local Indonesian host families and. In addition to the language course, the program will include short volunteer work opportunities with local organizations in Yogyakarta, cultural events, guest lectures, and field trips so that students may further immerse themselves in Indonesian culture and increase their knowledge of Indonesia. At the end of the Yogyakarta program, the students will spend three days in Jakarta, where they will have the opportunity to meet with senior government officials, business and NGO leaders, to discuss contemporary issues facing Indonesia.

For more information please visit the USINDO website (www.usindo.org). Applications are due on February 8, 2018. Click here for a PDF for more information about USINDO.  Should you have any question or further inquiries, please contact us at usindojkt@usindo.org or summerstudies@usindo.org.  

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New Publication

Former AIFIS Fellow Brian Arnold recently published a book on contemporary fine art photography in Java.  The book was published in conjunction with an exhibition at the Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University.  This is exhibition is the first in the United States devoted to work by Indonesian photographers.  The book was co-published by Afterhours Books in Jakarta and Cornell University in the United States.

Those interested in the book, it is available in Indonesia from Afterhours Books, and in the United States at Photo Eye Books.

 

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